CAWR Policy Briefs

CAWR Policy Briefs

The Centre for Agroecology, Water and Resilience (CAWR) works to ensure that its research and knowledge mobilisation have the greatest positive impact for equity, resilience and sustainability.

The centre’s Policy Briefs provide accessible, evidence-based, and timely analysis to audiences around the world, including policymakers, academics, practitioners, and social movements. The Policy Briefs enable CAWR and its partners to influence policy and institutional choices as well as stimulate change in practices at global, regional and local scales.


Financing Agroecological Transformations for Climate Repair

Published

November 2023

Author

Michel P. Pimbert

Abstract

Life-threatening heat waves, forest fires, hurricanes, rising sea levels, droughts and floods mean that climate change must be tackled on a ‘war footing’. With agri-food systems responsible for close to 40% of total greenhouse gas emissions, food and farming need priority attention in government negotiations at COP 28. A rapid and substantial reduction in carbon dioxide, nitrous oxide and methane emissions is urgently needed throughout the entire agri-food system and its global supply chains. There is growing consensus that agroecological approaches offer huge potential – not only to cut emissions, but also to create many more active carbon sinks. This briefing calls on governments to mobilise finance for the large-scale transitions needed towards climate-friendly food and farming. This will involve switching funding and subsidy support from globalised, fossil-fuel intensive, long-distance linear supply chains to re-localised agri-food systems; funding transitions to low-meat diets and agroecological livestock production; taxing financial speculations and the windfall profits of agri-food corporations; reducing the gross inequalities associated with greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in and between countries; and financing democracy for climate repair.


The Right to Food in the UK 

Published

November 2023

Authors

Jasber Singh and Imogen Richmond-Bishop

Abstract

The right to food and nutrition (RtFN) is a human right, but the high – and growing – levels of household food insecurity in the UK are in violation of this right, even though the UK Government has signed and ratified international instruments to protect, respect and fulfill the right to food and nutrition. Without incorporating the RtFN into domestic law so that it is justiciable, there are limited democratic mechanisms to challenge policies that cause persistent and worsening household food insecurity. Given the scale of the growing poverty crisis, it is now essential to incorporate the RtFN into domestic law to guarantee social protection for anyone living in the country, and to better understand and remove the structural root causes of poverty and associated hunger.

 


WOMEN ARE PEASANTS TOO: Gender equality and the UN Declaration on the Rights of Peasants

Published

December 2021

Authors

Priscilla Claeys and Joanna Bourke Martignoni

Abstract

Food sovereignty cannot be achieved for all people unless structural inequalities in food systems are identified and redressed. Women within agrarian social movements have long campaigned for gender equality and women’s rights to be fully integrated into policies and legal instruments designed to guarantee the rights to food, land, work and social security. The 2018 UN Declaration on the Rights of Peasants (UNDROP) is an important achievement for rural people as it explicitly recognises the human rights to land, seeds and food sovereignty. However, it fails to directly include key gender equality provisions, such as women’s right to inherit land. This brief discusses the various pressures that led to agrarian women’s demands being excluded from the final version of the declaration. It recommends steps that governments, civil society and international organisations can take to ensure that UNDROP is implemented in a way that promotes gender equality and women’s rights effectively.


Saying NO to development-forced displacement and resettlement: myths and alternatives

Published

April 2023

Author

Jessica Milgroom, Asmita Kabra and Brooke Wilmsen

Abstract

For 50 years, mainstream development thinking has legitimised the displacement and resettlement of people for large-scale projects such as dams, infrastructure and wildlifeconservation. But half a century of evidence shows, indisputably, that displacement causes social, economic and environmental harm, and that it cannot be mitigated by resettlement. Despite this evidence, estimates suggest that the number of people displaced for development has risen drastically in the last few decades, from 10 million a year in the 1990s to 20 million in the 2010s (Cernea and Maldonado, 2018). Resettlement continues to be the preferred solution to overlapping claims on land. The three authors of this brief have each been working in and researching development-forced displacement and resettlement (DFDR) for 15-20 years in different parts of the world. We come together to express our shared conclusion: displacement causes irreparable harm, and well-intended resettlement policies and practices perpetuate and justify further displacement. Decades of experience and research demonstrate that it is impossible to get large-scale resettlement right. New policies must prioritise human-scale development that does not require displacement.

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