CTPSR Research Insights

CTPSR Research Insights

The multi-disciplinary and ambitious researchers at the Centre for Trust, Peace and Social Relations employ a range of innovative and participatory research methods with the objective of handing power from the researcher to research participants, enabling them to influence practice and policy development through evidence-based approaches.

These approaches to our research are reflected in the 200+ peer reviewed publications produced by the centre each year. The new CTPSR Research Insights highlight the importance of research conducted at the centre and summarise findings in 2-page papers that are ideal for both policy and academic audiences. Anyone interested in learning more about the research will find suggestions for further reading in the Research Insights.


Incentivising the inclusion of counterterrorism protective security in the development of crowded places

Authors

David Mcllhatton

Abstract

Previous research by McIlhatton et al. (2018) explored how the real estate development process could potentially be used as a framework for maximizing the resiliency of commercial real estate and crowded places from terrorism. They focused on understanding how the different sectors (architects, investors, developers, planners, engineers, project managers, construction management, and urban designers) involved in real estate development consider the threat from terrorism and identified prominent barriers that need to be overcome for counterterrorism measures to become a key consideration. However, there is little empirical evidence in the literature on how the consideration and inclusion of counterterrorism security measures could be enhanced more rapidly, particularly through the real estate development process. We examine what would incentivise commercial real estate and crowded places developers to include counterterrorism as a core consideration within their decision-making process and provide an evidence base for those developing resilience policies, as well as those developing sites.


Domestic Abuse and the UK Church A study of church responses to domestic abuse in Cumbria

Author

Kristin Aune

Abstract

Research on domestic abuse among churchgoers and churches’ responses to it is plentiful in North America, but not in the UK. Christian charities deliver training on domestic abuse and advocate for policy change, but need evidence of the scale of the problem to enable them to respond appropriately. This research provides much-needed evidence on domestic abuse at local-level, focusing on the county of Cumbria in north-west England.


Protecting Crowded Places from Terrorism: An Analysis of the Current Considerations and Barriers Inhibiting the Adoption of Counterterrorism Protective Security Measure

Author

David Mcllhatton

Abstract

While much of the literature concerning counterterrorism focuses on policies and strategies aimed at removing either the terrorist environment and/or the groups or individuals willing to utilize political violence to achieve their goal(s), there is a much smaller body of work concerned with protective security, namely those security measures that are designed to manage risk, mitigate impact and enhance national security. Increasingly, crowded places have become popular targets for terrorists as evidenced by the significant number of such attacks in recent times. Crowded places will continue to be a significant attractor for terrorist attention, and as such, it is essential that the development of new crowded places recognises the importance of, and incorporate counterterrorism in, the planning, design, development, delivery, and operations of such locations.


Understanding the private security sector and its role in the organisation and governance of security

Author

Math Noortmann

Abstract

Private security is a fast-growing global industry which has existed for centuries and has outnumbered public police officers (Noortmann, 2011 & 2015). The increasing presence of private security personnel in public spaces; guarding and protecting property and persons, has not gone unnoticed. The privatisation of security and the private security sector have come under severe societal scrutiny. The position of private security companies is heavily influenced by images of private military companies in armed conflict resulting in sector stigmatization and demands for complete legal regulation. Calls for increased legal accountability and the legal curtailing of the sector often disregard the regulatory initiatives and codes of conduct that the sector has developed. Security in the 21st century is best organised as public-private partnership. The stigmatisation of the private security sector is not helpful in that respect. An unbiased understanding of the private security industry is desperately needed.

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