Dr. David Baker

Senior Lecturer in Criminology 

School of Psychological, Social and Behavioural Sciences
Faculty of Health and Life Sciences  

Email: d.baker@coventry.ac.uk  
LinkedIn Profile 

Biography 

I have been a Senior Lecturer in Criminology at Coventry University since 2008 where I lead and teach on a number of undergraduate Criminology modules. Prior to this I taught at the universities of Aston and Westminster. In 2013-14 I was awarded the title ‘Inspirational Teacher of the Year’ at Coventry University. I also teach in prisons for the Open University and am a trustee for Coventry Cyrenians, the principal organisation that supports homeless people in Coventry. I am a member of the Legal Action Group and the British Society of Criminology. In 2015 I was awarded a 3-month research sabbatical fellowship.

My research interests relate to police accountability. In 2016 my book: ‘Death after police contact: accountability and regulation in the 21st century’ will be published through Palgrave-Macmillan. My next research project focuses on families and their search for justice after family members have died after police contact. 

Qualifications
  • PhD Criminology: ‘Analysing the construction of accountability in cases of death after police contact’, Open University, 2012-2015
  • MA Social and Political Thought (with distinction), Warwick University, 2004-2006
  • Postgraduate Certificate in Learning & Teaching in Higher Education (with distinction), Coventry University, 2008-2009
  • Sociology and Politics BA (Hons): first-class, Open University, 1999-2004
Research interests

My PhD focused on how accountability is constructed in cases of death after police contact in England and Wales. This has so far produced a research monograph and two journal articles. I hope to publish 2 or 3 more journal articles as a result of my doctoral research. My next project focuses on family campaigns for justice in the aftermath of a death after police contact. This pilot project focuses on 15 family members; I hope to replicate this on a larger scale if the project is successful. 

Recent outputs and publications

Monograph 

  • Baker, D. (2016) Death after police contact: accountability and regulation in the 21st century. Basingstoke: Palgrave-Macmillan. [forthcoming]

Peer reviewed journal articles

  • Baker, D. (2015) ‘Researching death after police contact: challenges and solutions.’ Journal of Criminological Research, Policy and Practice 2 (1)
  • Baker, D. [forthcoming] ‘Deaths after police contact in England and Wales: the effects of Article 2 of the European Convention on Human Rights on coronial practice.’ International Journal of Law in Context. (Under review).

Conference presentations

  • Baker, D. (2015) ‘Guns ‘n razors: using narrative to construct accountability in cases of death after police contact’. Australian and New Zealand Society of Criminology Conference. Held 25-27 November 2015 in Adelaide, Australia.
  • Baker, D. (2015) ‘Omission as action in cases of death after police contact’. European Society of Criminology Conference. Held 2-5 September 2015 in Porto, Portugal. 
  • Baker, D. (2015) ‘Death after police contact: the effects of Article 2 of the European Convention on Human Rights’. British Society of Criminology Conference. Held 30 June – 3 July 2015 in Plymouth, UK. 
  • Baker, D. (2014) ‘Death after police contact: constructing accountability in the Coroner’s Court.’ GERN (Groupe Européen de Recherches sur les Normativités) Post-graduate Criminology Conference. Held September 2014 in Porto, Portugal.  

David-Baker-Coventry-University-Criminology

Teaching modules

I lead on the following undergraduate modules:

  • Current Issues in Criminology (309CRM)
  • Policing and Society (208CRM)
  • Careers for Criminologists (205CRM)

I teach on the following undergraduate modules:

  • Research Methods in Criminology (100CRM)
  • The Criminological Imagination (200CRM)
  • Research Project in Criminology (305CRM)
Areas of expertise
  • Policing and accountability 
  • Police regulatory bodies
  • Coroners’ courts