Pharmacology BSc (Hons)

 

Course Code

UCAS Code: B210
International Code: HLSU228

Location

Coventry University (Coventry)

 

Study mode

Full-time
Sandwich

Duration

3 years full-time
4 years sandwich

Start date

September 2022
January 2023


Course overview

Study level: Undergraduate

Our Pharmacology BSc (Hons) course aims to provide you with a thorough understanding of medicinal compounds and their effects on living systems.

  • Well-equipped suite of analytical and biological laboratories where you can gain hands-on experience using industry-standard techniques
  • No.1 in the Midlands for career prospects in Biological Sciences in the Times Good University Guide 2021
  • Support applying for placements in laboratory and industrial settings to gain crucial real-world experience
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Global Ready

An international outlook, with global opportunities

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Teaching excellence

Taught by lecturers who are experts in their field

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Employability

Career ready graduates, with the skills to succeed

Why you should study this course

This broad-based science degree is designed to enable you to pursue careers in integrative medical and pharmacological science or drug development.

It has been designed in response to the growing demand for a new breed of scientist who can apply scientific knowledge and skills to speed up the critical task of translating basic laboratory medical research into commercially ready medical technology and drugs that can be used to diagnose and treat patients. This emerging area of science is known as ‘translational medicine’.

Throughout the degree you will apply pharmacology and physiology to topics including diagnosis, understanding and treatment of disease, classical clinical trial design and health outcomes, supported by our excellent laboratory facilities. Core subject areas you will study include human biology in health and disease, clinical physiology, pharmacology, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, pharmacogenomics, drug development, bioinformatics, numeracy, statistics and computing, and a wide range of instrumentation and analytical techniques.

Following British Pharmacological Society (BPS) guidelines, this course is designed to give you a solid foundation in areas of biology that support an understanding of pharmacology. You will study human biology at all levels – from molecules and cells to whole body systems.

Our multi-million-pound Alison Gingell Building features a suite of analytical and biological laboratories where you can gain hands-on experience in cutting-edge industry techniques.

This course can be studied full-time over three years with the option of taking a placement or study abroad year after the second year, either studying abroad or on professional placement in an appropriate laboratory or other relevant setting, such as medical publishing. Past students have undertaken a variety of placements, working in roles involving clinical assay evaluation, pre-natal developmental research and safety testing of drugs.*


What you'll study

The first year of the course is shared with other biosciences courses (Biomedical Science BSc and Human Biosciences BSc) and provides underpinning knowledge, laboratory and data analysis skills relevant for Pharmacology. This shared approach allows you to appreciate a diversity of applications and roles for biosciences and to gain a broad topic understanding.

Modules

  • In this module you will consider the key features of eukaryotic cells, their organisation into tissues and organs, and the structure and function of major physiological systems in the human body. You will have the opportunity to integrate knowledge from multiple disciplines including anatomy, physiology, biochemistry, cell and developmental biology, to develop an understanding of human cell and body function and an appreciation of disease states.

    Compulsory

    Assessment: test and coursework

  • Our genetic information, its structure, function and inheritance (genotype), and how this determines the characteristics of an individual (phenotype) is what you will study on this module. You will be introduced to the principles of heredity, the complexity of human genetics, human individual variation, evolutionary principles and population genetics. The central dogma of DNA to RNA to protein (transcription and translation) will be also be discussed. On successful completion of the module, you will gain knowledge and skills relating to DNA manipulation in the laboratory, and the retrieval and analysis of sequence information using bioinformatics tools. You will also examine the ethical issues resulting from increased access to genomic information.

    Compulsory

    Assessment: test and presentation

  • You will be introduced the principles and practice of key laboratory techniques used in the analysis of biological molecules. You will be supported to understand and develop a sound appreciation of good laboratory practice, including maintenance of laboratory records, quality assurance, competence in fundamental laboratory procedures and routine calculations such as concentration and dilution. You should also gain an understanding of the use of contemporary digital technologies to analyse and present data effectively, and the format of standard laboratory reports.

    Compulsory

    Assessment: test and coursework

  • In this module you will have a series of regular small group or individual tutorials with your Academic Personal Tutor (APT). The aim of these sessions is to encourage self-awareness and self-reflection, to enable you to develop strategies to enhance your own development, to maximise your academic success and also your career prospects. These tutorials will allow you to get to know your APT and to develop your skills and competencies. You will start to establish an evidence-based portfolio that you will extend throughout your university studies to provide a valuable resource for future employability.

    Compulsory

  • The role of enzymes as biological catalysts to facilitate chemical reactions within the body will be your focus in this module. You will also examine the role of energy in determining the rate and direction of chemical reactions, and the mechanisms by which enzymes act to lower energy requirements. Enzyme assays and the kinetics of enzyme reactions including reagent and enzyme concentrations, reaction conditions, cofactors and inhibitors are investigated in theory and in practice will also be considered.

    Compulsory

    Assessment: test

  • This module introduces you to the different types of microorganisms with a detailed focus on bacteria and viruses. You will consider the structure, growth characteristics and laboratory cultivation/propagation and enumeration of bacteria and viruses, and the role of microorganisms in both human health and disease is explored, together with an introduction to the body’s protective response to infection, the immune system. You will investigate control strategies for microorganisms, including sterilisation, disinfection, antimicrobial compounds and vaccines, together with current and emerging concerns such as antimicrobial resistance are considered. Laboratory classes will develop key skills in aseptic technique and culture of bacteria and viruses.

    Compulsory

    Assessment: test and coursework

  • This module will introduce you to the fundamental principles of cell communication operating in both healthy and disease states, and the mechanisms of action of selected drugs that act via cellular receptors (pharmacodynamics). You will also examine the absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion of drugs (pharmacokinetics). The search for novel or improved drugs involves many stages, from target identification, compound synthesis, in vitro and in vivo testing, including human clinical trials. You will be introduced to this process, including consideration of ethical, safety and regulatory issues.

    Compulsory

    Assessment: test and coursework

  • In this module, you will demonstrate your developing laboratory and professional skills and competencies and preparedness for future employment. Workshop and tutorial sessions involving the university’s Talent Team will raise awareness of opportunities available from this course, placements, short work experience and other enhancement activities and encourage you to create an appropriate online networking profile.

    Compulsory

    Assessment: objective structured practical and portfolio

  • The focus on preparing students for successful futures helps to set Coventry apart as a university.

    The Add+vantage modules teach a range of work experience and extra-curricular activities that are taken each year and broaden students’ knowledge and skills within a work focused environment. There is a very wide range of Add+vantage free-choice subject areas, and they are arranged in themes.

    Compulsory

In the second year there is a greater emphasis on the biology of disease. You will begin to specialise in pharmacology and related areas including physiology, biochemistry, immunology and genetics.

Laboratory work is a key component of the course, enabling you to learn the experimental techniques and develop the key experimental, data handling and reporting skills required for careers in science. Practical sessions will introduce you to modern laboratory techniques and clinical approaches to diagnosing and treating disease, while your research skills are broadened to include an understanding of research methodology and design, medical statistics and methods of data analysis.

Practical exercises will investigate the use of biochemical techniques and their application to the study of drug action, as well as some of the methods used in molecular biology and to culture mammalian cells and micro-organisms such as bacteria. You will learn how to prepare and use isolated tissues to study the actions of drugs, analysing and recording responses appropriately.

Modules

  • This module integrates key disciplines of human physiology, biochemistry and pharmacology to explore disease states, their diagnosis within the clinical laboratory, and the rationale, mode of action and pharmacokinetic properties of drug therapies. You will consider four fundamental topic areas (nervous, cardiovascular and respiratory systems plus infectious disease) and the properties and modes of action of commonly prescribed drugs. Pharmacological considerations such as individual variation are addressed where relevant for these examples.

    Compulsory

    Assessment: test and coursework

  • In this module you will explore the activities of the cell that are fundamental to understanding disease states. A myriad of chemical reactions and molecular interactions allow cells to grow and divide, alter their activities and functions, organise into tissues, communicate with each other and ultimately die. These normal processes are frequently altered or hijacked in disease. You will also explore how novel therapeutic approaches are emerging based on this molecular understanding.

    Essential techniques for pharmacologists: This module is designed to enable you to develop laboratory, practical and associated data analysis skills that are of key importance in pharmacology, for example to measure drug and metabolite concentrations, detect drug contaminants and to determine pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic parameters.

    Compulsory

    Assessment: coursework and presentation

  • You will extend your learning from Pharmacology and pathophysiology 1 to consider normal and pathophysiology, biochemical diagnosis and management, and pharmacological agents for therapy of disease states affecting the gastrointestinal, renal and endocrine systems. You will apply the key pharmacological principles relating to drug mechanisms and pharmacokinetics.

    Compulsory

    Assessment: test and coursework

  • The immune system in both health and disease and pharmacological agents which modulate immune responses will be your focus in this module. The links between chronic inflammation and multiple disease phenotypes will be discussed. The ability to exploit elements of the immune system for use as stratified immunotherapies will be introduced and explored in the context of hypersensitivity reactions, allergy and cancer.

    Compulsory

    Assessment: test and coursework

  • This module takes the form of a group based “mini-project”. You are recruited to research teams acting as consultants for a pharmaceutical company. The consultancy project will involve literature and technical research, laboratory practical investigation and generation of a report for the company. You apply for roles within the teams and successful appointment to the chosen project team will be determined by interview.

    During the project you are expected at all times to demonstrate professional behaviours and conduct, collaborative team working, leadership and time management skills. Your team will consider topics such as intellectual property, confidentiality and commercial application of research findings. The literature review, experimental planning, data analysis and critical evaluation, plus logistical considerations will help you to tackle your final year capstone project.

    Compulsory

    Assessment: presentation and portfolio

  • This module takes the form of a group based “mini-project”. You are recruited to research teams acting as consultants for a pharmaceutical company. The consultancy project will involve literature and technical research, laboratory practical investigation and generation of a report for the company. You apply for roles within the teams and successful appointment to the chosen project team will be determined by interview.

    During the project you are expected at all times to demonstrate professional behaviours and conduct, collaborative team working, leadership and time management skills. Your team will consider topics such as intellectual property, confidentiality and commercial application of research findings. The literature review, experimental planning, data analysis and critical evaluation, plus logistical considerations will help you to tackle your final year capstone project.

    Compulsory

    Assessment: presentation and portfolio

  • The focus on preparing students for successful futures helps to set Coventry apart as a university.

    The Add+vantage modules teach a range of work experience and extra-curricular activities that are taken each year and broaden students’ knowledge and skills within a work focused environment. There is a very wide range of Add+vantage free-choice subject areas, and they are arranged in themes.

    Compulsory

Following your second year, you will have an option to apply for a one-year professional work placement or study abroad in a partner institution.

If you wish to do so, you can opt to take the Professional Work placement module or the Study abroad module which both typically run for a full academic year between years 2 and 3 of your course.*

Whilst we would like to give you all the information about our placement/study abroad offering here, it is often tailored for each course every year and depending on the length of placement or study abroad opportunities that are secured. Therefore, the placement and study abroad arrangements vary per course and per student. Please contact ukadmissions@coventry.ac.uk for more information about going on a placement or study abroad year.

Modules

  • Compulsory

  • Optional

The final year of your course gives you the opportunity to carry out an independent research project in an area of pharmacology, physiology or cell biology, as well as an in-depth study of applied pharmacology, cancer biology, chemotherapy and genetics.

Modules

  • Cancer is one of humanity’s greatest health challenges and it is estimated there will be 27.5 million new cases of cancer each year by 2040. Consequently, the development of anti-cancer therapies in order to improve the clinical management of cancers has been a central objective of the pharmaceutical industry and the focus of worldwide research efforts. In this module you will review the multiple oncogenic processes that allow cancer to arise, including consideration of emerging cancer hallmarks of metabolic adaptation, immune system evasion and the importance of the tumour microenvironment.

    Advances in understanding of molecular oncology has enabled the generation of rationally designed targeted therapies which selectively interfere with discrete oncogenic effectors. You will cover this new generation of therapies for specific cancers and compare them to traditional cytotoxic chemotherapeutics. Particular focus will also be given to new concepts that break away from traditional therapeutic approaches by targeting the non-malignant, rather than malignant, cell components within tumours.

    Compulsory

    Assessment: coursework

  • During this module you will consider two key areas which present contemporary pharmacological challenges. Cardiovascular conditions, heart disease and stroke are still major disease concerns globally. Events occurring in the brain are complex and, in some cases, still poorly understood. In this module you will consider the current challenges in cardiovascular and neuropharmacology and explore the potential opportunities and barriers to future developments.

    Compulsory

    Assessment: coursework

  • This is an assessment only module which will consolidate your learning from Cancer Biology and Therapeutics and Advanced Topics in Cardiovascular and Neuropharmacology. The module will allow you to demonstrate your knowledge and understanding of current pharmacological challenges in these key disease areas.

    Compulsory

    Assessment: viva

  • In this module, you will prepare for your final year research project. You will be supported through the process of defining your research question, planning your investigation and considering the most appropriate data analysis methods. The module will enhance your skills in literature searching, experimental design, scientific writing, data processing and statistical analysis. You will submit a proposal for ethical and health and safety approval, and to address key aspects of project design, management and logistics.

    Compulsory

    Assessment: coursework

  • You will discuss drug development processes, indicating how these have evolved from ancient times to the current day and beyond. Starting with pharmacognosy (medicinal drugs obtained from plants or other natural sources) and pre-industrial drug discovery. Throughout the module you will go on to consider stages of the process including target identification, in vivo and in vitro drug screening, testing of large and small molecule compounds, compound optimisation, clinical trials and marketing. You will then consider recent breakthrough technologies, the impact of genomics in the development of personalised therapies and what future developments may yield.

    Compulsory

    Assessment: coursework and presentation

  • Drug abuse concerns the use of particular chemicals for pleasure or reward. Users of these chemicals may become dependent and suffer long term consequences for health and well-being. The scale of drug abuse worldwide affects hundreds of millions of individuals, putting pressure on health and social care resources. In addition, addiction to prescription medication is recognised as a growing concern. In this module you will explore the physiological mechanisms leading to drug addiction, the mechanisms of action and consequences of prolonged drug use, and strategies for detoxification and future avoidance. You will also consider the role of the toxicology laboratory in monitoring prescribed drug therapies and management of accidental or deliberate overdose and ensuring the quality and safety of medication.

    Compulsory

    Assessment: coursework

  • The aim of this module is to enable you to conduct a piece of investigative research, which may be laboratory or non-laboratory based, in a specialised area of Pharmacology. This module follows from Research Design for Pharmacology and you implement your research proposals in this module. The variety and scope of projects allows you to pursue your own interests, potentially linked to future career aspirations, and to integrate prior skills and knowledge. You are supported and guided by your supervisor, but are encouraged to develop independence of thought, and the ability and confidence to adapt and evolve your research ideas, based on reflective practice.

    Compulsory

    Assessment: coursework

  • The focus on preparing students for successful futures helps to set Coventry apart as a university.

    The Add+vantage modules teach a range of work experience and extra-curricular activities that are taken each year and broaden students’ knowledge and skills within a work focused environment. There is a very wide range of Add+vantage free-choice subject areas, and they are arranged in themes.

    Compulsory

We regularly review our course content, to make it relevant and current for the benefit of our students. For these reasons, course modules may be updated.


How you'll learn

Our teaching is all supported by an extensive suite of analytical and biological laboratories staffed by experienced technicians. In addition, each module is supported by extensive online material to help prepare you for your taught sessions and to assist with your personal study.

Where possible, coursework uses applied tasks that mimic the skills needed in jobs, such as collection and interpretation of drug dose response data to assess therapeutic and lethal ranges. The course also offers the opportunity for industry visits and fieldtrips, which have previously included visit to Nottingham’s BioCity, the UK’s largest bioscience business incubator in the UK*.

Regular research seminars will bring you the latest issues on a wide range of research topics, like a recent session on pharmacovigilance by AstraZeneca. You will also have the opportunity to undertake challenging independent research projects dealing with questions at the cutting-edge of life science research, which have previously tackled cardioprotective agents, free radicals and cellular ageing.

The university may deliver certain contact hours and assessments via emerging online technologies and methods across all courses. In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, we are prepared for courses due to start in or after the 2020/2021 academic year to be delivered in a variety of forms. The form of delivery will be determined in accordance with Government and Public Health guidance. Whether on campus or online, our key priority is staff and student safety.

Due to the ongoing restrictions relating to Covid-19, some facilities (including some teaching and learning spaces) and some non-academic offerings (particularly in relation to international experiences), may vary from those advertised and may have reduced availability or restrictions on their use.

Teaching contact hours

In a typical teaching week, you will have around 17 ‘contact’ hours of teaching. The contact hours may be made up of a combination of face-to-face teaching, individual and group tutorials, and online classes and tutorials.

In addition, you will be expected to undertake a further 20 hours of self-directed study each week e.g. working on coursework assignments.

As an innovative and enterprising institution, the university may seek to utilise emerging technologies within the student experience. For all courses (whether on-campus, blended, or distance learning), the university may deliver certain contact hours and assessments via online technologies and methods.


Assessment

This course will be assessed using a variety of methods which could vary depending upon the module. Assessment methods include coursework, tests, essays, formal examinations, practical or project work, group work, presentations and posters.

The Coventry University Group assessment strategy ensures that our courses are fairly assessed and allows us to monitor student progression towards the achieving the intended learning outcomes. Assessments may include exams, individual assignments or group work elements.


Job ready

Successful completion of this course will equip you with the skills and knowledge to contribute to current and emerging challenges in the understanding of drug actions and reactions and the development of new drugs to help fight disease. At the end of the course you will have the skills and knowledge to meet the demand for suitably trained professionals within the global pharmaceutical industry to expedite the critical task of translating basic laboratory medical research into technology and drugs that can be used to diagnose and treat patients.

It is anticipated that on successful completion of this course you could have employment opportunities in a range of industries including pharmaceutical research and development roles, clinical trials, drug regulation and sales and marketing.


International experience opportunities

The international perspective is reflected in a number of modules on the course, which deal with issues of global importance, such as drug discovery and development from natural products including treatments for malaria, HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis and worm infections (helminths).

The course provides the opportunity for online collaboration with overseas institutions on a joint problem-based learning assignment. For example, previous students have joined others from University of Seville investigating the prevalence and approach to managing neurodegenerative disorders and the differing policies with regard to legal highs within the UK and Spain. Our sandwich degree option also allows a year’s work placement or study, which can be taken abroad.*


Entry requirements

Typical offer for 2022 entry

Requirement What we're looking for
A level BBB to include Biology. Excludes General Studies.
GCSE Minimum 5 GCSEs graded 9-4 / A*- C including English Language, Mathematics and two Sciences.
BTEC DDM in the BTEC Level 3 Extended National Diploma in a Biology or Science related subject.
IB Diploma 30-32 points to include a minimum of grade 5 in Biology at Higher Level.

A levels

A level applicants are required to have three A levels at grade BBB

Access Diplomas

The Access to HE Diploma to include 30 Level 3 credits at Merit of which 15 must be in Biology units, plus GCSE English Language & Mathematics at grade 9-4/A*-C, or specified equivalents.

Coventry University welcomes applicants who have completed, or who are studying, the Access to HE Diploma developed by the Quality Assurance Agency for Higher Education (QAA). Successful completion of the course will require you to gain 60 credits with at least 45 to be achieved at Level 3 (with the remainder at Level 2). In some cases we will require you to have gained Merit or Distinction grades in a number of units or in nominated subjects. For more information on the entry requirements for your chosen course please see the relevant course pages.

BTEC Level 3 Diplomas

The University will accept the BTEC Level 3 Extended Diploma for entry to most courses. In some cases we will require applicants to have studied either certain named modules or a specific named Diploma.

We will accept Extended Diploma or Diploma in combination with another A level equivalent.

We recognise a breadth of qualifications, speak to one of our advisers today to find out how we can help you.

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Are you eligible for the Fair Access Scheme?

We believe every student should have the opportunity to dream big, reach their potential and succeed, regardless of their background.

Fair Access Scheme

Select your region to find detailed information about entry requirements:

You can view our full list of country specific entry requirements on our Entry requirements page.

If you do not have the typical entry requirements, you may want to consider studying this course with an international foundation year. Upon successful completion our International Foundation Year - Biosciences will provide you with the knowledge and skills you need to progress onto this undergraduate degree.

Alternatively, visit our International hub for further advice and guidance on finding in-country agents and representatives, joining our in-country events and how to apply.

English language requirements

  • IELTS: 6.0 overall (with no component lower than 5.5)

If you don't meet the English language requirements, you can achieve the level you need by successfully completing a pre-sessional English programme before you start your course. 

For more information on our approved English language tests visit our English language requirements page.

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Fees and funding

2022/23 Tuition fees

Student Full time Part time
UK £9,250 per year Not available
International £16,650 per year Not available

For advice and guidance on tuition fees and student loans visit our Undergraduate Finance page and see The University’s Tuition Fee and Refund Terms and Conditions.

We offer a range of International scholarships to students all over the world. For more information, visit our International Scholarships page.

Tuition fees cover the cost of your teaching, assessments, facilities and support services. There may be additional costs not covered by this fee such as accommodation and living costs, recommended reading books, stationary, printing and re-assessments should you need them. Find out what's included in your tuition costs.


Facilities

Alison Gingell

Alison Gingell Building

The multi-million-pound Alison Gingell Building is home to microbiology, cell culture, molecular biology/genetics, biochemistry and forensic science laboratories, allowing you to work in a professional environment from day one.

Laboratory with people wearing white coats taking samples

SuperLab

Our state-of-the-art SuperLab has facilities including equipment for microscopy, DNA analysis and forensic testing.

 
Blonde lady wearing a lab white suite looking into a dish

Analytical Chemistry suite

This is where our students apply their practical and theoretical knowledge to real-life working scenarios. We use a new generation chromatography technique, to analyse products ranging from pharmaceutical agents, to cosmetics, drinks and toxins.


Careers and opportunities

A large number of medical scientists are employed by companies in the pharmaceutical industry, where they are involved in discovering and developing drugs and carrying out clinical trials. Medical scientists may also work for contract research organisations (CROs) or academic departments within universities on research projects. There are also career options within government laboratories (including environmental agencies), charity-funded research organisations, such as the Medical Research Council (MRC), and with other research institutes. 

The scientific knowledge and skills you acquire during the course can be a useful basis for a career in: teaching; technical and scientific writing (such as medical writing or writing for the media); clinical trials; drug registration, patenting or monitoring; medical publishing or other information services; regulatory affairs or sales and marketing. Opportunities also exist for postgraduate study upon successful completion of the course, at both master’s and PhD level.

Coventry University is committed to preparing you for your future career and giving you a competitive edge in the graduate job market. The university’s Talent Team provide a wide range of support services to help you plan and prepare for your career.

Where our graduates work

Our graduates have gone on to careers in drug discovery and development, clinical trials development and governance within the pharmaceutical industry and university and hospital departments. Recent examples include working as a regulatory strategist and trials manager for Pfizer, as an education administrator for Education for Health and as activities coordinator for the TLC group.


How to apply


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  • Student Contract

    By accepting your offer of a place and enrolling with us, a Student Contract will be formed between you and the university. A copy of the 2021/22 Contract can be found here. The Contract details your rights and the obligations you will be bound by during your time as a student and contains the obligations that the university will owe to you. You should read the Contract before you accept an offer of a place and before you enrol at the university.

    Tuition fees

    The tuition fee for the course that is stated on the course webpage and in the prospectus for the first year of study will apply. We will review our tuition fees each year. For UK and EU students, if Parliament permit an increase in tuition fees, we may increase fees for each subsequent year of study in line with any such changes. Note that any increase is expected to be in line with inflation. Following the UK’s exit from the European Union, EU students should be aware that there may be a change to UK laws following the UK’s exit, this may change their student status, their eligibility to study part time, and/or their eligibility for student finance. We will act in accordance with the UK’s laws in force in relation to student tuition fees and finance from time to time.

    For International students the tuition fee that is stated on the course webpage and in the prospectus for the first year of study will apply. We will review our tuition fees each year. For international students, we may increase fees for each subsequent year of study but such increases will be no more than 5% above inflation.

    Accreditations

    The majority of our courses have been formally recognised by professional bodies, which means the courses have been reviewed and tested to ensure they reach a set standard. In some instances, studying on an accredited course can give you additional benefits such as exemptions from professional exams (subject to availability, fees may apply). Accreditations, partnerships, exemptions and memberships shall be renewed in accordance with the relevant bodies’ standard review process and subject to the university maintaining the same high standards of course delivery. 

    Facilities

    Facilities mentioned on this page may not be relevant for every course. Due to the ongoing restrictions relating to COVID-19, some facilities (including some teaching and learning spaces) and some non-academic offerings (particularly in relation to international experiences), may vary from those advertised and may have reduced availability or restrictions on their use.

    Placements and study abroad opportunities

    Please note that we are unable to guarantee any placement or study abroad opportunities and that all such opportunities may be subject to additional costs (e.g. travel, visas and accommodation etc.), competitive application, availability and/or meeting any applicable visa requirements. To ensure that you fully understand the requirements in this regard, please contact the International Office for further details if you are an EU or International student.

    Additional costs

    This course may incur additional costs associated with any field trips, placements or work experience, study abroad opportunities or any other opportunity (whether required or optional), which could include (but is not limited to), equipment, materials, bench fees, studio or facilities hire, travel, accommodation and visas).