Spotlight

Spotlight

Our team of dedicated researchers are continuously working on projects to influence our teachings. Here are just a few of the projects we are currently working on:

Projects Researcher(s)
Maths Meets Myths (Funded by Leverhulme and the European Science Foundation) Professor Ralph Kenna
Postgraduate researchers

Below are just some examples of the research projects recently or currently being carried out by PhD students within the school:

  • Antal Goldschmidt is currently investigating algorithms for the placement of sensors for intrusion detection and prevention in software-defined networks. Typically, network sensors are used to capture traffic and relay anything from raw captures to summary statistics to an intrusion detection or prevention system (IDS/IPS) with their placement and configuration determined at the design stage of the network, or during review. Software-defined networks allow more flexible and responsive network placement and configuration, potentially changing on the fly in response to conditions within the network.
  • Inhabited virtual cities are fast becoming a prominent feature in various graphical applications. Simulated crowds are employed for different purposes; ranging from evacuation procedures to interactive elements in video games. For many applications, it is important that the displayed crowd behaviour is perceptually plausible to the intended viewers. Increasing the complexity of the algorithms does not guarantee an increase in the perceptual plausibility of crowd behaviour. Stuart O’Connor is developing methods for using comparative psychophysics to assess behavioural features for their perceived realism, using extensive empirical studies to show the ways in which crowd simulation parameters affect perceived realism.
  • Charn Pisithpunth is a current PhD student in serious games. His thesis focuses on a game to improve knowledge about the impact of human population growth on the environment. Based on an exhaustive literature review, Guidelines for Environmental Games (or GEG) were outlined and applied to the development of THE GROWTH; a quiz-based, city-management game. A randomized controlled trial (n=82) compared participants who played THE GROWTH to a control group of people who read comparable textual information. Participants who played THE GROWTH showed significantly greater increases in knowledge and greater recall of information about population growth compared to controls. The results provide evidence that a game approach based on GEG promotes learning about the environment based on scientifically rigorous methods considered the gold standard in intervention research. 
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