Agroecology, Water and Food Sovereignty MSc 2019/20 entry

Course code:

EECT008

Study options:

1 year full-time
2 years part-time

Location:

Coventry University

Starting:

September 2019

 

Fees:
Faculty:

Get in touch

For questions regarding study and admissions please contact us:

+44 (0) 24 7765 4321

For questions regarding the Course, please contact Liz Woodard
liz.woodard@coventry.ac.uk | tel: +44(0)24 7765 1600

Course code:

EECT008

Study options:

1 year full-time
2 years part-time

Location:

Coventry University

Starting:

September 2019

 

Fees:
Faculty:

Get in touch

For questions regarding study and admissions please contact us:

+44 (0) 24 7765 4321

For questions regarding the Course, please contact Liz Woodard
liz.woodard@coventry.ac.uk | tel: +44(0)24 7765 1600

Course code:

EECT008

Study options:

1 year full-time
2 years part-time

Location:

Coventry University

Starting:

September 2019

 

Fees:
Faculty:

Get in touch

For questions regarding study and admissions please contact us:

+44 (0) 24 7765 4321

For questions regarding the Course, please contact Liz Woodard
liz.woodard@coventry.ac.uk | tel: +44(0)24 7765 1600

Overview

The Agroecology, Water and Food Sovereignty MSc is a transdisciplinary course addressing current issues related to food production, access and management of natural resources, climate change and land degradation, and the environmental, socio-economic and institutional implications in the building of resilient societies.

It has a strong focus on resilient food and water systems, critically-analysed under environmental, socio-economic and political lenses to reflect the broad range of issues that relate to food and water sovereignty and how agroecology can alleviate them.

Why Coventry University?

An award-winning university, we are committed to providing our students with the best possible experience. We continue to invest in both our facilities and our innovative approach to education. Our students benefit from industry-relevant teaching, and resources and support designed to help them succeed. These range from our modern library and computing facilities to dedicated careers advice and our impressive Students’ Union activities.

Global ready

An international outlook, with global opportunities

Employability

Career-ready graduates, with the skills to succeed

Student experience

All the support you need, in a top student city

What our students say...

We have covered a huge range of subjects within the context of food and water – from climate change to gender – and the interactive teaching style has kept me really engaged. Although it’s impossible to cover all of these topics in depth in the time that we have, if you’d like to explore a certain area further the resources you need to do so are there. The flexible approach to assessments means you can focus on the topics that interest you.

Sam Morgan (2018-19)

Course information

This course is based on CAWR’s structural pillars of agroecology, resilience, and water and food sovereignty.

It is different in integrating both the natural and social sciences, providing you with a flexible yet comprehensive learning experience. You will have the opportunity to gain knowledge and experience in the fields of food sovereignty, agroecology, as well as individual and collective human security and well-being that goes beyond the usual research fields of food systems and food security.

Agroecology is the discipline that addresses practical aspects of resilient food production and natural resources management, their environmental impact as well as the governance and socio-economic challenges facing current food and farming systems.

Water and Food Sovereignty widen the focus of the course, closely linking agroecological approaches that reflect the need to address pressing global issues (i.e. access to adequate nutrition), our right to healthy and culturally appropriate food produced through ecologically sound and sustainable methods; and people’s right to define their own food, agriculture, livestock and fisheries systems. The concept of food sovereignty also promotes the formulation of trade policies and practices that serve the rights of people to safe, healthy and ecologically sustainable food production.

This is a new approach to the design and management of socio-ecologically resilient water and food systems in that it goes beyond the issue of access to natural resources, food and water, and addresses their governance locally, nationally and at global scale.

Course Specification
Download PDF

Modules

Overview

The Agroecology, Water and Food Sovereignty MSc is a transdisciplinary course addressing current issues related to food production, access and management of natural resources, climate change and land degradation, and the environmental, socio-economic and institutional implications in the building of resilient societies.

It has a strong focus on resilient food and water systems, critically-analysed under environmental, socio-economic and political lenses to reflect the broad range of issues that relate to food and water sovereignty and how agroecology can alleviate them.

Modules

  • Policies and Institutions for Water and Food Sovereignty

    This module introduces students to a range of progressive thinking and actions that are orientated towards food and water policy-making, and institutions. Adopting a ‘real-world’, people-centred, bottom-up approach, it will locate contemporary struggles for food system transformation at different scales, and in their wider policy and institutional contexts.

    For more information, please contact the module leader Joshua Brem-Wilson.

  • Global Process for Water Sustainability and Resilience

    This module is concerned with the fundamental processes (biological, chemical, physical or social and cultural) that underpin environments, focusing predominantly on aquatic environments.

    Students will develop a deeper understanding of how human behaviour can influence these processes (e.g. climate change) and the impact that the modified processes can, in turn, have on the environmental (e.g. modified rainfall) and human systems (e.g. changes in food or water sustainability).

    For more information, please contact the module leader Jonathan Eden.

  • Community Self-Organisation and Resilience

    This module focuses on the complex and contested ways in which communities self-organise to manage the food and water resources upon which they depend by looking at a range of different examples of community self-organisation from across the globe.

    For more information, please contact the module leader Adrian Evans.

  • Resilient Food and Water Systems in Practice

    This module aims to provide students with a broad perspective on the applied dimensions of agroecological food and water systems.

     

    For more information, please contact the module leader Katharina Dehnen Schmutz.

  • Participation, Power and People’s Knowledge

    This module explores the politics behind knowledge, focusing on the structure of power and its links to creating or silencing knowledge production. It also looks at the use of participatory action and transdisciplinary research approaches in the context of current forms of colonisation, the politics of difference, social relations and how these interlink with food, environment and water.

    For more information, please contact the module leader Jasber Singh.

  • Agroecological Techniques and Practices

    This module focuses on agricultural technologies that sustain yields whilst ensuring food nutritional health, with an emphasis on biological interactions that reduce the reliance on external inputs. Key areas include the maintenance of soil fertility (for example by the use of green manures and composted wastes), weed, pest and disease management (for example by using cultural and biological controls), the importance of biodiversity and the efficient management of key resources, such as water, energy and plant varieties.

     

    For more information, please contact the module leader Francis Rayns.

  • Gender, Food Systems and Natural Resources

    This module will critically assess how the use, management and knowledge of land, water and the wider ecology is gendered, including the contradiction that women's importance as managers and users of natural resources is recognized, whereas the rights to these is vested in men. It will investigate the theory, policy and practice of gender in the governance of food systems and natural resources, and analyse the shortcomings of attempts to integrate women into development programmes.

     

    For more information, please contact the module leader Stefanie Lemke.

  • Stabilisation Agriculture

    This module aims to familiarise students with stabilisation theory relevant to agriculture, landscape and urban management.  It also aims to provide students with practical skills in the planning and design of stabilisation agriculture programmes, and the planning and evaluation of urban agriculture policies.

     

    For more information, please contact the module leader Liliane Binego.

  • Project

    This module aims to extend the experience of the student in independent investigative work with a view to enhancing the ability of the student to undertake research on an issue or issues relevant to one or more of the mandatory or optional modules of the MSc.  It is an essential component of the award of an MSc.

     

    For more information, please contact the module leader Jackie Abell.

We regularly review our course content, to make it relevant and current for the benefit of our students. For these reasons, course modules may be updated.

In more detail...

The course includes modules which address key themes in:

  • Resilient food and water systems
  • Agroecological processes and practices
  • Fundamental process in relation to soil and water management
  • Climate change
  • Governance and institutional frameworks
  • Communities self-organisation for resilience
  • Knowledge integration
  • Gender studies
  • Economics of sustainable food and water systems
  • Ecological management of freshwater systems
  • Stabilisation agriculture.

The delivery of the curriculum will be informed by University and Faculty/School developments in teaching and learning. Each of the course modules has activi

This course will be assessed using a variety of methods which will could vary depending upon the module. This course is predominantly assessed by coursework.

The Coventry University Group assessment strategy ensures that our courses are fairly assessed and allows us to monitor student progression towards the achieving the intended learning outcomes. Assessments may include exams, individual assignments or group work elements.

On successful completion of the course, you should be able to:

  • Critically appraise how agroecology, food security, and water and food sovereignty are defined, conceptualized and practiced, including a focus on contested meanings of key concepts used in the course (agroecology, resilience, gender, environmental change etc.);
  • Undertake an in-depth analysis of contemporary food and water systems and assess their relation to individual and collective human security and wellbeing, and the environment;
  • Critically evaluate the concept of resilience and its fundamental underlying processes, emphasising community resilience and social ecological resilience at different scales;
  • Critically assess the roles of policies and institutions in the governance and management of food and water systems at scales (local, national, global);
  • Formulate appropriate methods of enquiry and analysis that facilitate different ways of knowing (e.g. transdisciplinary, participatory, peer-to-peer, intercultural dialogue) and effective engagement with the major debates on the dynamics of food and water systems;
  • Carry out enhanced research for differentiated analysis (e.g. by class, gender, ethnicity, intersectionality, and other axis of difference) of knowledge(s), access to resources and decision-making within communities and actor networks influencing the dynamics of food and water systems;
  • Manage their own independent learning and self-reflective practice and to engage in continuing learning and professional development in the food and water sectors especially in relation to food and water sovereignty; and
  • Work towards and achieve both individual and group goals within the course and subsequent professional practice.

You will receive dedicated administrative support through the various stages of your progress, from application to award. Course Directors are available to advise students on academic and pastoral issues. Times that Course Directors are available to meet with students will be shown on the course Moodle website. Module Leaders and the associated module team are also available to offer support at a module level. Again, module leaders advertise their contact times on the module Moodle website. Outside of office hours, students can also email any member of academic staff.

CAWR has an extensive network of contacts globally that regularly collaborate with staff. In particular, we have strong links with institutions such as the Scuola Superiore Sant’Anna, Pisa, Italy (specialist post-graduate research and teaching institution) and Stellenbosch University, South Africa.

During the MSc you will be able to liaise with staff that have links to institutions nationally and internationally, based on your specific interests, ranging from institutions carrying out research in more applied natural sciences to other social and community-based organisations.

Global ready

Did you know we help more students travel internationally than any other UK university according to data from the experts in higher education data and analysis, HESA?

In 2016/17, we were able to provide a total of 3,482 student experiences abroad that lasted at least five days.

Much of this travel is made possible through our Global Leaders Programme, which enables students to prepare for the challenges of the global employment market, as well as strengthening and developing their broader personal and professional skills.

Explore our international experiences

1st for

international experiences

Sending more students overseas than any other UK uni (HESA 2016/17)


3,482

Student experiences

The number of student trips abroad for at least 5 days in 2016/17


21,000

and counting

The number of students we’ve helped travel internationally so far

12

global programmes

As well as trips, we offer other opportunities like language courses


What our students say...

We have covered a huge range of subjects within the context of food and water – from climate change to gender – and the interactive teaching style has kept me really engaged. Although it’s impossible to cover all of these topics in depth in the time that we have, if you’d like to explore a certain area further the resources you need to do so are there. The flexible approach to assessments means you can focus on the topics that interest you.

Sam Morgan (2018-19)

Entry Requirements

UCAS entry profiles may be found by searching for the relevant course on the UCAS website, then clicking on ‘Entry profile’.

Normally, the entrance requirement is a second classification degree in a relevant discipline. Current requirements are specified on the course page of the university web page. 

Applicants are normally invited to visit the University as part of the postgraduate open days in the Faculty of Engineering, Environment and Computing. This offers an opportunity for either party to evaluate each other and to ask questions. It also offers the applicant an opportunity to view the facilities on offer at the University. 

International applicants with an equivalent of a second class honours degree or demonstrated experience at an appropriate level will be considered for admission. Applicants whose first language is not English or who have not completed a first degree in which English was the main language of tuition must provide evidence of English language ability.

UCAS entry profiles may be found by searching for the relevant course on the UCAS website, then clicking on ‘Entry profile’.

Normally, the entrance requirement is a second classification degree in a relevant discipline. Current requirements are specified on the course page of the university web page. 

Applicants are normally invited to visit the University as part of the postgraduate open days in the Faculty of Engineering, Environment and Computing. This offers an opportunity for either party to evaluate each other and to ask questions. It also offers the applicant an opportunity to view the facilities on offer at the University. 

International applicants with an equivalent of a second class honours degree or demonstrated experience at an appropriate level will be considered for admission. Applicants whose first language is not English or who have not completed a first degree in which English was the main language of tuition must provide evidence of English language ability.

English as a Foreign Language: This course requires IELTS of 6.5 overall, with no component lower than 5.5. Pre-sessional English is available if required.

Our International Student Hub offers information on entry requirements for your country, as well as contact details for agents and representatives should you need more advice.

More detail

Normally, the entrance requirement is a second classification degree in a relevant discipline. Current requirements are specified on the course page of the university web page.

Applicants are normally invited to visit the University as part of the postgraduate open days in the Faculty of Engineering, Environment and Computing. This offers an opportunity for either party to evaluate each other and to ask questions. It also offers the applicant an opportunity to view the facilities on offer at the University. 

International applicants with an equivalent of a second class honours degree or demonstrated experience at an appropriate level will be considered for admission. Applicants whose first language is not English or who have not completed a first degree in which English was the main language of tuition must provide evidence of English language ability.

English as a Foreign Language: This course requires IELTS of 6.5 overall, with no component lower than 5.5. Pre-sessional English is available if required.

Our International Student Hub offers information on entry requirements for your country, as well as contact details for agents and representatives should you need more advice.

More detail

What our students say...

We have covered a huge range of subjects within the context of food and water – from climate change to gender – and the interactive teaching style has kept me really engaged. Although it’s impossible to cover all of these topics in depth in the time that we have, if you’d like to explore a certain area further the resources you need to do so are there. The flexible approach to assessments means you can focus on the topics that interest you.

Sam Morgan (2018-19)

Tuition Fees

We pride ourselves on offering competitive tuition fees which we review on an annual basis and offer a wide range of scholarships to support students with their studies. Course fees are calculated on the basis of what it costs to teach each course and we aim for total financial transparency.

Starts

Fee


September 2019

£8,350 (per year)


UK Scholarships

If you're a truly outstanding undergraduate candidate we may be able to offer you a Coventry University Scholarship. Coventry University Scholarships are awarded to recognise truly exceptional sports achievement and academic excellence.

Starts

Fee


September 2019

£8,350 (per year)


EU Scholarships

We're investing into scholarships for high achieving and enterprising students.

Our scholarships are worth up to £10,000 and every student that applies will be considered. Fulfil your potential this academic year with Coventry University!

Starts

Fee


September 2019

£14,000 (per year)


International Scholarships

We're investing into scholarships for high achieving and enterprising students.

Our scholarships are worth up to £10,000 and every student that applies will be considered. Fulfil your potential this academic year with Coventry University!

EU student fees

EU nationals and their family members starting in the 2019/20 academic year remain eligible for the same fees as home students and the same financial support. Financial support comes from Student Finance England, and covers undergraduate and postgraduate study for the duration of their course, providing they meet the residency requirement.

For tuition fee loans

EU nationals must have resided in the European Economic Area (EEA) or Switzerland for the three years prior to the start of their course. The purpose of that three year residency should not have been mainly for the purpose of receiving full time education.

For maintenance loans

EU nationals must have resided in the UK and Islands for the five years prior to the start of their course. The purpose of that five year residency should not have been mainly for the purpose of receiving full time education.

What our students say...

We have covered a huge range of subjects within the context of food and water – from climate change to gender – and the interactive teaching style has kept me really engaged. Although it’s impossible to cover all of these topics in depth in the time that we have, if you’d like to explore a certain area further the resources you need to do so are there. The flexible approach to assessments means you can focus on the topics that interest you.

Sam Morgan (2018-19)

Career prospects

Career prospects can include scholarly research to strengthen the impact of academia on shaping resilient societies; employment by development organisations, local and national governing bodies, and international institutions (e.g. United Nations [UN], Department for Environment, Food & Rural Affairs [DEFRA], Natural England, Environment Agency, Department for International Development [DFID], Consortium of International Agricultural Research Centers [CGIAR], International Livestock Research Institute [ILRI], International Centre for Research in Agroforestry [ICRAF], Oxfam); and entrepreneurship in several sectors, e.g. agriculture, environmental management, civil society, and policy.

Where our graduates work

The course is designed to appeal to a wide range of graduates from a variety of disciplines. Students successfully completing the course may go on to do a PhD at the Centre or elsewhere, and pursue a career in academia. Other potential employers include:

  • National and international government agencies
  • Non-governmental organisations
  • Research and development organisations
  • Vocational teaching and training
  • Community based organisations
  • Private sector, including small food companies and the farming sector.

What our students say...

I believe that this programme equipped me with necessary knowledge and skills to address food security problems in communities, especially in reaching out to the poor and the underprivileged, to understand and address their needs and to come up with the ultimate outcome that can improve the quality of their lives and ensure a sustainable livelihood.

I have successfully combined this experience with my nutritional background in my thesis project where I critically examined the nutritional status of Syrian refugees in Lebanon especially vulnerable groups such as children, pregnant and lactating women in order to make recommendations to practitioners and policy makers for an effective nutritional management. My MSc thesis was subsequently published as a book in the United States, United Kingdom and Germany in April 2016.

Yara Taraby (2014-15, MSc Agroecology and Food Security)
Disclaimer

By accepting your offer of a place and enrolling with us, a Student Contract will be formed between you and the University. A copy of the 19/20 Contract can be found here. The Contract details your rights and the obligations you will be bound by during your time as a student and contains the obligations that the University will owe to you. You should read the Contract before you accept an offer of a place and before you enrol at the University.

The tuition fee for the course that is stated on the webpage and in the prospectus will apply. If the duration of the course is longer than one academic year, the University may increase the fee for each subsequent year of study but any such increases will be no more than inflation.

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Coventry University awarded TEF GOLD Teaching Excellence Framework
University of the year for student experience
QS Five Star Rating 2019
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