Coventry University | Dr. Martin Wilkes
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Dr. Martin Wilkes

Research Fellow, CAWR

My Research Vision

I am an interdiscplinary researcher studying interactions between the living world and the physical environment in freshwater ecosystems. My work involves the application of concepts and methods from biology, ecology, hydrology, hydraulic engineering and geomorphology. Much progress has been made in this interdisciplinary field, known as 'hydroecology', in recent years but there is much work still to do in sharing knowledge and better integrating the often disparate approaches from these disciplines. This is extremely important in river ecosystems where biophysical linkages are especially strong. My vision is to help the freshwater-related research community to make the best use of existing knowledge, identify information gaps and fill those gaps with original research that is truly interdisciplinary.

BIOGRAPHY

Martin has worked in the energy industry, local government and environmental consultancy for over 17 years, taking part in and leading projects relating to waterways and other public infrastructure. After graduating from University of Worcester in 2009, Martin went on to complete an MSc in River Environmental Management at the University of Birmingham. He returned to Worcester the following year to undertake a PhD.

His doctoral thesis implemented a hydrodynamic view of rivers at multiple scales in order to develop new ways of assessing habitat quality for Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) and modelling the impacts of hydropower development on threatened fish communities in South America. With his background in highly regulated industries, Martin has an excellent awareness of legislative issues and has put this to good effect in providing guidance to EU member states on compliance with the Water Framework Directive and the Habitats Directive.

SELECTED OUTPUTS

  • Wilkes, M. A., Maddock, I. & Acreman, M. C. (in review) Hydrodynamic habitat selection by wild Atlantic salmon (Salmo Salar) parr. Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences
  • Wilkes, M. A., Maddock, I., Link, O. & Habit, E. (in press) A community-level, mesoscale analysis of fish assemblage structure in shoreline habitats of a large river using multivariate regression trees. River Research and Applications
  • Wilkes, M. A., Maddock, I., Visser, F. & Acreman, M. C. (2013) Incorporating Hydrodynamics into Ecohydraulics: The Role of Turbulence in the Swimming and Habitat Selection of River-dwelling Salmonids. In Kemp, P., Harby, A., Maddock, I. & Wood, P. J. (eds.) Ecohydraulics: An Integrated Approach, Wiley, Chichester. 
  • Wilkes, M. A., Al-Janabi, S., Elam, J., Ratcliffe, R., Bence, A., Nineham, N. & Hopes, E. (2010) Ecosystem development in a flood relief channel. Proceedings of the River Restoration Centre 11th Annual Network Conference, York.
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Research Fellow, Centre for Agroecology, Water and Resilience

Building: James Starley
Room: JSB01
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