Coventry University | Dr. Hayley Crawford
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Dr. Hayley Crawford

Research Associate

My Research Vision

My research focusses on the cognitive and social problems experienced by children and adults with genetic syndromes associated with intellectual disability. This research helps further understand the difficulties faced by individuals with rare genetic syndromes and their families. It is hoped that this research will translate into practical and effective interventions that ultimately improves the well-being of individuals with rare genetic syndromes.

BIOGRAPHY

Hayley graduated from the University of Birmingham with a first class honours degree in Psychology in 2010. She then worked as a research associate at the Cerebra Centre for Neurodevelopmental Disorders before securing funding from the ESRC to complete a Masters of Research degree and a PhD under the supervision of Professor Chris Oliver, Dr Joanna Moss and Dr Joseph McCleery. During her PhD, Hayley presented her work at a number of national and international conferences and was awarded the 2014 Patricia Howlin Lecturer Prize. She is now continuing her research as a Research Associate at Coventry University where she is investigating mental health and behavioural difficulties in children and adults with autism and rare genetic syndromes associated with intellectual disability.

SELECTED OUTPUTS

  • Crawford, H., Moss, J., Anderson, G.M., Oliver, C., and McCleery, J.P. (2015) ‘Implicit discrimination of basic facial expressions of positive/negative emotion in Fragile X syndrome and autism spectrum disorder’. American journal on intellectual and developmental disabilities 120 (4), 328-345. Available from http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1944-7558-120.4.328
  • Crawford, H., Moss, J., McCleery, J.P., Anderson, G.M., and Oliver, C. (2015) ‘Face scanning and spontaneous emotion preference in Cornelia de Lange syndrome and Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome’. Journal of neurodevelopmental disorders 7 (1), 1-12. Available from http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s11689-015-9119-4
  • Christou, A.I., Wallis, Y., Bair, H., Crawford, H., Frisson, S., Zeegers, M.P., and McCleery, J.P. (2015) ‘BDNF Val66Met and 5-HTTLPR Genotype are Each Associated with Visual Scanning Patterns of Faces in Young Children’. Frontiers in behavioral neuroscience 9. Available from http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fnbeh.2015.00175
  • Crawford, H., Moss, J., Groves, L., Dowlen, R., Reid, D., Nelson, L., and Oliver, C. (2014) ‘The effect of adult familiarity and nature of interaction on social anxiety and motivation in Fragile X, Rubinstein-Taybi and Cornelia de Lange syndromes’. Oral Abstracts, Journal of Intellectual Disability Research 58 (10), 883. Available from http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jir.12156
  • Penhallow, J., Moss, J., Wilde, L., Eden, K., Waite, J., Bull, L., Crawford, H., Heald, M., Nelson, L., and Oliver, C. (2014) ‘Lifespan changes in Autism Spectrum Disorder characteristics in seven genetic syndromes: an eight year follow up’. Oral Abstracts, Journal of Intellectual Disability Research 58 (10), 886. Available from http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jir.12156
  • Crawford, H.R., Moss, J., Oliver, C., Elliott, T., Anderson, G.M., and McCleery, J.P. (2014) ‘People or trains? Visual preference for social versus non-social information in genetic syndromes’. Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities 27 (4), 301. Available from http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jar.12107
  • Adams, D., Hastings, R., Bull, L., Crawford, H., Griffith, G., Hamilton, C., Heald, M., Jackson, N., Eden, K., Karakatsani, E., Moss, J., Nelson, L., Penhallow, J., Powis, L., Richards, C., Stinton, C., Villa, D., Waite, J., Wilde, J., Wilde, L., and Oliver, C. (2014) Stress associated with parenting a child with a rare condition: data from 343 mothers of children with nine genetic syndromes and 89 mothers of children with autism. Scientific Posters,Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology 56 (s3), 10. Available from http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/dmcn.12460
  • Mace, H., Moss, J., Anderson, G., Oliver, C., and McCleery, J. (2012) ‘Interpreting faces and eyes in individuals with autism spectrum disorder, fragile X syndrome and Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome’. Oral Abstracts, Journal of Intellectual Disability Research, 56 (10), 923-928. Available from http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2788.2012.01612.x
  • Mace, H., Moss J., McCleery, J., Stinton, C., and Oliver, C. (2012) ‘Research update from the Cerebra Centre for Neurodevelopmental Disorders’. Newsletter of the Fragile X Society, UK (62),  9-11.
Keynote Presentations
  • Crawford, H. (2015) ‘Anxiety in Cornelia de Lange syndrome’. Cornelia de Lange Syndrome National Conference. Held March 2015 in Liverpool, UK.
  • Crawford, H. (2014) ‘Social processing in autism spectrum disorder’. Autism West Midlands Research Forum. Held 18 November 2014 in Birmingham, UK.
  • Crawford, H. (2014) ‘Anxiety in Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome’. Rubinstein-Taybi Syndrome National Conference. Held October 2014 in Garstang, UK.
  • Crawford, H. (2014) ‘Anxiety in Cornelia de Lange syndrome’. Cornelia de Lange Syndrome National Conference. Newcastle, UK, October 2014.
  • Crawford, H., Moss, J., Oliver, C., Anderson, G., and McCleery, J. ‘Research update: Social processing in Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome’. Rubinstein-Taybi Syndrome Family Meeting. Held May 2014 in Cardiff, UK.
  • Mace, H., Moss, J., Oliver, C., Anderson, G., and McCleery, J. (2013) ‘Eye tracking to explore spontaneous emotion discrimination and face processing in autism spectrum disorder, fragile X, Cornelia de Lange, and Rubinstein-Taybi syndromes’. Neurodevelopmental Disorders Seminar: Visual Attention and Eye Movements in Developmental Disorders. Held 20 March 2013 in Newcastle, UK.
  • Mace, H., Moss, J., Anderson, G., Oliver, C., and McCleery, J. (2012) ‘Research update: Spontaneous emotion discrimination and face processing in Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome’. Rubinstein-Taybi Syndrome Family Meeting. Held December 2012 in Daventry, UK.
Peer-Reviewed Oral Presentations
  • Crawford, H., Moss, J., Groves, L., Dowlen, R., Nelson, L., Reid, D., and Oliver, C. (2015) ‘Adult Familiarity and Nature of Interaction on Social Anxiety and Motivation in Fragile X, Cornelia de Lange and Rubinstein-Taybi syndromes’. 48th Annual Gatlinburg Conference. Held 1-3 April 2015 in New Orleans, USA.
  • McCleery, J. P., Crawford, H., Christou, A., Oliver, C., Moss, J., and Anderson, G. (2015) ‘Reduced eye-looking for static face stimuli is associated with amygdala and serotonin functioning’. Face Processing Pre-Conference, Society for Research in Child Development Biennial Meeting. Held 18 March 2015 in Philadelphia, USA.
  • Crawford, H., Moss, J., Groves, L., Dowlen, R., Reid, D., Nelson, L., and Oliver, C. (2014) ‘The effect of adult familiarity and nature of interaction on social anxiety and motivation in Fragile X, Rubinstein-Taybi and Cornelia de Lange syndromes’. Patricia Howlin Prize Lecture, 17th SSBP International Research Symposium. Held 10-12 October 2014 in New York, USA.
  • Crawford, H., Moss, J., Oliver, C., Anderson, G., and McCleery, J. (2014) ‘People or trains? Visual preference for social versus non-social information in genetic syndromes’. IASSIDD Europe Regional Congress. Held 14-17 July 2014 in Vienna, Austria.
  • Crawford, H., Moss, J., Oliver, C., Elliott, T., Anderson, G., and McCleery, J. (2014) ‘People or trains? Visual preference for social versus non-social information in genetic syndromes and neurodevelopmental disorders’. Neurodevelopmental Disorders Seminar Series: Cognition and Behaviour in Neurodevelopmental Disorders. Held 20 June 2014 in Durham, UK.
  • Mace, H., Moss, J., Anderson, G., Oliver, C., and McCleery, J. (2012) ‘Interpreting faces and eyes in individuals with autism spectrum disorders, fragile X syndrome and Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome’. 15th SSBP International Research Symposium. Held October 2012 in Leuven, Belgium.
  • Mace, H., Moss, J., Oliver, C., Anderson, G., and McCleery, J. (2012) ‘Spontaneous emotion discrimination in individuals with autism spectrum disorder and fragile X syndrome’. 13th International Fragile X Conference. Held 25-29 July 2012 in Miami, USA.

SELECTED PROJECTs

  • Identifying single nucleotide polymorphisms associated with clinical features of fragile X syndrome
    This study aims to investigate the potential relationship between genetic variation and variability in behavioural characteristics associated with fragile X syndrome.
  • Social cognition in neurodevelopmental disorders
    This study will investigate the development of theory of mind skills in autism spectrum disorder
  • Challenging Behaviour in Lowe Syndrome
    In particular, the research aims to understand the development of behaviour disorder in Lowe syndrome including the risk markers for the development of challenging behaviour, and detailed information on how behaviour is established and maintained
  • Visual preference for social and non-social information in rare genetic syndromes and neurodevelopmental disorders
    This study investigated eye movement patterns to dynamic social and non-social stimuli in children and adults with autism spectrum disorder, fragile X, Cornelia de Lange and Rubinstein-Taybi syndromes
  • Face scanning and spontaneous emotion discrimination in rare genetic syndromes
    This study used eye-tracking technology to study attention to faces and emotion discrimination in children and adults with autism spectrum disorder, fragile X, Cornelia de Lange and Rubinstein-Taybi syndromes
  • Social anxiety and social motivation in rare genetic syndromes
    This study used behavioural observation and manipulation of social environment to study behavioural markers of social anxiety and social motivation in Fragile X, Cornelia de Lange, Rubinstein-Taybi and Down syndromes
  • Visual scene scanning in fragile X syndrome
    This study uses eye tracking technology to investigate visual scanning of naturalistic social scenes in males with fragile X syndrome
  • Anxiety in Williams syndrome
    This study will investigate the prevalence and phenomenology of anxiety in Williams syndrome 
Research breakout image

Research Associate

Building: James Starley
Room: JSG12
Research Gate Google Scholar Hayley Crawford