Coventry University | Dr. EJ Milne
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Dr. EJ Milne

Senior Research Fellow, Member of CTPSR Ethics Committee

My Research Vision

My research focuses on issues of social justice, the politics and ethics of research and innovative research methodologies and methods. I use qualitative methods and specialise in critically reflective, creative and sensory research. This includes participatory and community based research; and sensory methods including photography (photovoice, photo elicitation, visual focus groups, photo diaries), film (participatory video, video diaries, documentary), drawing and mapping; and audial-methods (soundscapes, music, audio diaries).

My work seeks to further the development of more negotiated processes of knowledge production working not only in my interests, and that of the academy, but also for the interests of, and for, participants and their communities. To this end community members and civil society organisations are often involved in my research as co-researchers and research partners.

BIOGRAPHY

EJ Milne is a Senior Research Fellow in the Centre for Communities and Social Justice; a Research Associate at the African Centre for Migration and Society, Witwatersrand University, South Africa; the UK co-representative on the Pool of European Youth Researchers (PEYR), an expert panel established by the European Commission and the Council of Europe to advise on European youth policy and research; and Vice President of the International Sociological Association Visual Sociology Group (WG03).

Her research focuses on the process, politics and ethics of knowledge production with particular regard to people in transition and / or affected by conflict. This includes people identifying as LGBTQI, migrants and refugees and young people. Her recent publications include ‘Visual activism and social justice: making young people’s lives visible across ‘public’ and ‘private’ spaces’, Critiquing participatory video: experiences from around the world’, Wee favours, everyday help and support: the Glasgow Study., and The Handbook of Participatory Video. 

You can find out more about EJ Milne’s work at here

Her research focuses on the process, politics and ethics of knowledge production with particular regard to people in transition and / or affected by conflict. This includes people identifying as LGBTQI, migrants and refugees and young people. Her recent publications include ‘Visual activism and social justice: making young people’s lives visible across ‘public’ and ‘private’ spaces’, ‘Critiquing participatory video: experiences from around the world’, Liveable Lives: understanding everyday help and support; and The Handbook of Participatory Video.

SELECTED OUTPUTS

SELECTED PROJECTS

  • Marginalised voices. Exploring arts-based and narrative methodologies for understanding the lived experiences of migrant sex worker and migrant LGBTQI communities in South Africa and the UK, with Professor Jo Vearey, African Centre for Migration and Society, Witwatersrand University, South Africa
  • Connecting States of Desire: Sustaining Sexual Identities in the Lives of Refugee Youth: This ongoing project is exploring how feasible LGBTQ refugee communities are, and the inherent dangers or impossibility associated with articulating LGBTQ identities in refugee communities and organisations. The project is designed to effect real change in a refugee organisation by making non-white LGBTQ lives and stories not only visible, but viable. It is unique in that it does not solely focus on refugees whose applications for asylum was based on sexuality. It also considers the way gender, race and faith can complicate 'coming out' for refugees who are already in the UK. 
  • Ordinary Support & 'Liveable Lives': the Glasgow studyThe Liveable Lives project researched social relationships, risk and trust in three geographically proximate, but contrasting localities, in Glasgow. This comparative study explored how people jointly constructed and maintained the webs of ordinary support to make life ‘liveable’ and how the giving and receiving of support is influenced by health, socio-economic circumstance and ageing. 
  • Young People Creating Belonging: spaces, sounds and sights: This ESRC funded project looked at young people's sense of belonging, relationships and sensory experience of space; developing methods to explore sensory, particularly visual and audial, experiences of space; and contributing to the development of relational policy and practice with children in transition. The multi-sensory data can be viewed at http://sightandsoundproject.org.uk
  • Participation and Community on Bradford’s Traditionally White EstatesThis Community Based Research project research showed how residents on two traditionally white estates understood their communities. It explored how they participate within them and with agencies and other bodies, with the emphasis on residents’ own views. The research considered why, given the partial achievements and commitment to improving the lives of the most excluded social groups, government has been unable to generate sustainable change in such settings.
Research breakout image

Senior Research Fellow, Member of CTPSR Ethics Committee

Building: Innovation Village 5
Room: 1st Floor
Research Gate Academia.edu