Sleep and Early Cognitive Development in Down Synd...
CLOSE

Campus Map

Working with Coventry University

Working at Coventry University

Coventry University is a diverse and exciting place to work and we share the enthusiasm of our staff and students to be the best at whatever they choose to do. As one of the City’s biggest employers, we offer some impressive benefits for our staff and are committed to delivering the very best opportunities. We have a comprehensive training, personal and professional development programme that provides our employees with the skills to enhance their performance in the workplace and grow in their careers. There are pension schemes, a generous holiday allowance and flexible working opportunities as well as lifestyle benefits including childcare vouchers, discounted membership to the £4 million sports and recreation centre and schemes such as Cycle to Work and the CU Car Share initiative.

View current job vacancies.

LOG IN TO THE COVENTRY UNIVERSITY SITE

Staff portal

Access the central point of information for all staff across the University.

LOG IN TO THE STAFF PORTAL

Student Portal

Check your assessments, access Solar and get course information.

LOG IN TO THE STUDENT PORTAL

Sleep and Early Cognitive Development in Down Syndrome


Funder

Coventry University

Value

£9,350

Collaborators

Dr Dagmara Dimitriou (Institute of Education, London)

Project Team

Dr. Anna Joyce (née Ashworth)


Project Objectives

It is well known that sleep problems in children have significant and wide-reaching detrimental effects on a range of cognitive abilities, such as attention, executive functions, motor skills and language abilities.

Children with Down syndrome have severe sleep problems, particularly with breathing, as well as cognitive and behavioural difficulties. It is currently unknown how sleep problems affect early cognitive development in individuals with DS.

This study explores, for the first time, the relationship between objective measures of sleep and well-validated indices of early cognitive development in 2- to 4 year-olds with and without Down syndrome. 

Research Impact

We expect that sleep problems are common in children with Down syndrome compared to typically developing children, and that sleep problems contribute to delays in early cognitive abilities such as motor skills, visual perception and language development. These findings will support the notion that sleep problems should be examined and treated from an early age in children with DS, which may be crucial for achieving the greatest cognitive outcomes and life chances. This will have wide-reaching clinical and educational implications and set the stage for follow-up intervention studies.